Art by Caroline Walls

With a strong sense of colour and graphic form, Caroline Walls is a visual artist who creates work with a skilled and fluid approach to aesthetics. Caroline’s creative practice has crossed continents to New York and London where she has divided her time between working in large-scale creative agencies and furthering her art practise.

Upon returning to Melbourne, Caroline has established herself as an art director and artist in her Carlton North studio.

Caroline’s work explores the movement and contours of the female figure by reducing the body to its most essential form to heighten its expressive power. Though her print works demand strong use of colour, often working with subtle tone on tones, Caroline strips back the very same in her paintings so as not to lose the detail or gesture of her strokes.

She works intuitively on the human form and is interested in the fluidity of the body, intimacy and the construction and complexity of the female identity.

Art by Renato Grome

Renato Grome’s work explores perception, often from the perspective of an outsider looking in.

“I look at the world surrounding me with an out-of-body-vision, as though my eyes are outside their sockets, outside of my head, with a 360º vision.”

Grome is internationally known for his intensive flower photographs produced through his fully analogue technique using positive film and RA4 hand-printing, attaining a reversal of reality. The positive is the negative. This inverse technique creates surreal intense colours, making iconic images both seductive and darkly disquieting.

Renato Grome likes to create a device specifically to carry forward his visual story, this can be a custom built technical rig or a small set, these are deeply interconnected with telling the story, and is their sole mechanical purpose. Grome varies his photography techniques from film, pin-hole cameras, high-res digital format, low-res digital format, and custom-made lenses.

Renato Grome has exhibited in private galleries and public art institutions in Bologna, Boston, Istanbul, Melbourne, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Sydney, Tokyo, Trieste and Verona.

Art by Minnie Pwerle

Minnie Pwerle born between 1910 and 1922 – 18 March 2006) was an Australian Aboriginal artist. She came from Utopia, Northern Territory (Unupurna in local language), a cattle station in the Sandover area of Central Australia 300 kilometres (190 mi) northeast of Alice Springs.

Minnie began painting in 2000 at about the age of 80, and her pictures soon became popular and sought-after works of contemporary Indigenous Australian art. In the years after she took up painting on canvas, until she died in 2006, Minnie’s works were exhibited around Australia and collected by major galleries, including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Queensland Art Gallery. With popularity came pressure from those keen to acquire her work. She was allegedly “kidnapped” by people who wanted her to paint for them, and there have been media reports of her work being forged. Minnie’s work is often compared with that of her sister-in-law Emily Kame Kngwarreye, who also came from the Sandover and took up acrylic painting late in life. Minnie’s daughter, Barbara Weir, is a respected artist in her own right.

Art by George (Hairbrush) Tjugurrayi

George Tjungarrayi was born “in the bush” in Pintupi country across Western Australia border c. 1947. He began painting in West Camp in Papunja about 1976 for Papunya Tula Artists and continued painting while residing at Yai Yai, Warawa, Mt Liebig and now Kintore. His ancestral country covers sites around Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura, Lake Mackay, Kulkuta, Karku, Ngaluwinyamana and Kilpinya to the north-west of Kintore across the West Australian border. George Paints the Tingari stories for this region.

George’s work is represented in most public galleries and many significant corporate collections.

Art by Nancy Kunoth Petyarre

Yukultji Napangati is an Australian Aboriginal artist. She is a painter of the Papunya Tula group of artists. She is part of a generation of female painters who followed in the footsteps of the original male Papunya Tula artists.[3]

Yukultji grew up around Marruwa, a waterhole near Lake Mackay. She grew up without knowing about places like Kiwirrkurra, or her relatives living there. She had never met anyone from outside her own family.[4] Her family lived a completely traditional nomadic way of life. Her father, Lanti (or “Joshua”), had lived for a short time at the mission in Balgo, but he had run away after getting into trouble for stealing food. It was his decision to stay in the desert, and kept his family far away from the towns. Yukultji’s father died sometime around 1980. The family finally came into contact with outsiders in October 1984, and were settled at Kiwirrkurra.[2] The event was big news at the time, and the family became famously known as “the last nomads”.[5] Yukultji was the youngest of this group.[6]

Yukultji experienced major culture shock when first coming out of the desert. She often found new things difficult to understand. In an interview once, she remembers, “I hopped into a car and crouched down, and I saw the trees move. I was frightened. I was scared. I jumped right off because the trees were racing around the place.”[4]

Yukultji began painting in the early 1990s. Before this, she had watched her brothers painting and later decided to try it for herself. She paints stories and songs from her and her mother’s dreaming. These stories are about her traditional country, around Marruwa, Ngaminya and Marrapinti.[4][7]

Her paintings are shown in several public collections in Australia. Her work has been shown in over 80 exhibitions in Australia and overseas. She was a finalist in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2011.[8] In 2012, Yukultji won the Alice Prize, an award for Australian artists in Alice Springs.[9]

Art by Yukultji Napangati

Yukultji Napangati is an Australian Aboriginal artist. She is a painter of the Papunya Tula group of artists. She is part of a generation of female painters who followed in the footsteps of the original male Papunya Tula artists.

Yukultji grew up around Marruwa, a waterhole near Lake Mackay. She grew up without knowing about places like Kiwirrkurra, or her relatives living there. She had never met anyone from outside her own family. Her family lived a completely traditional nomadic way of life. Her father, Lanti (or “Joshua”), had lived for a short time at the mission in Balgo, but he had run away after getting into trouble for stealing food. It was his decision to stay in the desert, and kept his family far away from the towns. Yukultji’s father died sometime around 1980. The family finally came into contact with outsiders in October 1984, and were settled at Kiwirrkurra. The event was big news at the time, and the family became famously known as “the last nomads”.Yukultji was the youngest of this group.

Yukultji began painting in the early 1990s. Before this, she had watched her brothers painting and later decided to try it for herself. She paints stories and songs from her and her mother’s dreaming. These stories are about her traditional country, around Marruwa, Ngaminya and Marrapinti.[4][7]

Her paintings are shown in several public collections in Australia. Her work has been shown in over 80 exhibitions in Australia and overseas. She was a finalist in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2011. In 2012, Yukultji won the Alice Prize, an award for Australian artists in Alice Springs.

Art by Mantua James Nangala

Nangala was a small girl when her father Anatjari Tjampitjinpa and her mother Mamurlu Napaltjari came in from the desert in 1963. One of the last groups to do so under the direction of Welfare patrols lead by Jeremy Long. The patrol, with Nosebag Tjupurrula and a Tjamptijinpa from Payunya had been looking for them on the road i.e.. the original road made by Lea Beadel west into Western Australia from the Sandy Blight Junction.

They met at “Mukala.” At the time Nangala and her family were living on ‘bush mangari’i.e.. damper made from seeds and were getting scare water from rockholes.

Nangala learnt to paint whilst assisting her father at Kintore in the early 1980’s. Mantua paints designs associated with secret Tingari ceremonies at the site of Tjulna, located south-east of Kiwirrkurra and other sites of her father’s country.